Drinking beer, 365 days a year

December 22, 2008 | By | Comments (1)

About a year ago I received the gift of a page a day calendar called 365 bottles of beer for the year. Everyday it features a different brewery from various countries throughout the world with detailed tasting notes on one of the featured breweries particular beers.
Some days they have an item called a quaff quote or label lore with humorous sayings or pertinent information with respect to beer.
Throughout this year I have collected some ditties that I hope will ferment a profound impact on your vision of brewing or at least put a smile on your face.
Here they are. Enjoy.

In 1862, the U.S. Congress imposed a beer tax as a way of raising money to fight the Confederacy in the Civil War.—Hey, I think we’ve found a way to balance the budget.
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In St. Louis, it is illegal to sit on a curb of any street and drink beer from a bucket.
They don’t mess around in St. Louis.
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English pubs used to bake a whistle into the rims of their beer mugs as a way for customers to order more beer, hence the phase, “wet your whistle”
I always wondered where that phrase came from.
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Beer was first sold in bottles in 1850 and first sold in cans in 1935.
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A term coined by the Victorians, pub, an abbreviation of “public house” refers to an inn or tavern. They were often designed to replicate the convivial social setting of home. Before painted signs became commonplace, publican’s often posted a distinctive object such as a boot or crown outside their premises.
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The longest bar in the world is said to be 684 feet long and is located at the New Bulldog in Rock Island, Illinois. Belly up to the bar-everyone.
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It is illegal in Texas to take more than three sips of beer at a time while standing.
I’m glad I live in California.
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The four basic ingredients in beer are water, hops malt and yeast. The exact role of yeast was unknown until 1876 when French researcher Louis Pasteur scientifically established its role in the fermentation process.
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“There is more to life than beer alone, but beer makes those other things better.” Author Stephen Morris.
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German monk and brewer Benno Schari is said to have been the first to isolate the lager yeast, a breakthrough he accomplished in the early 19th century. God bless him.

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“The pub knows a lot, almost as much as the churches” Amen, brother.
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“Beer does not make itself properly by itself. It takes an element of mystery and of things that no one can understand.” This is a quote by my hero, Fritz Maytag.
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Ninkasi, the 3600B.C. Sumerian goddess of beer known as “the lady who fills the mouth” was portrayed as the giver and protector of beer and brewing. Until the Middle Ages, brewing was considered the exclusive domain of women, who were known as “brewsters.” That’s why I love women.
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“It’s a fair wind that blew men to ale”. Washington Irving.
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“If you can boil water, you can brew beer”. This is an old home brewing saying and with God as my witness, it’s true.
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I will leave you with what is considered a timely toast by Lewis Henry.
“Here’s to a long life and a merry one.
A quick death and an easy one.
A pretty girl and an honest one.
A cold beer and another one.”

This is also a great time of year to introduce yourself to the many seasonal beers that are brewed all over the world and the best time of the year to drink them.

By Rick LaFrentz, Beerless leader

COMMENTS

  1. Elaine Saunders

    The medieval ale conner had the job of testing the strength of beer for taxation purposes. As this could not be measured with a scientific instrument he had to resort to more ingenious means. He’d pour a little of the beer onto a wooden bench and then, wearing leather trousers, sit in it. If the sugar content of the beer made it sticky enough to glue his trousers to the bench it would be deemed strong and taxed at a higher rate.

    Elaine Saunders
    Author: A Book About Pub Names
    Complete Text
    It’s A Book About….blog

    December 23, 2008 at 5:24 pm

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